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About This Series

The Greysheet Catalog (GSID) of the Brasher Doubloons series of Colonial & Post-Colonial Issues in the U.S. Coins contains 5 distinct entries with CPG® values between $2,520,000.00 and $11,220,000.00.
Among the most famous pieces coined before establishment of the U.S. Mint at Philadelphia were those produced by the well-known New York goldsmith and jeweler Ephraim Brasher, who was a neighbor and friend of George Washington. The gold pieces Brasher made weighed about 408 grains and were valued at $15 in New York currency. They were approximately equal to the Spanish doubloon, which was equal to 16 Spanish dollars.

Pieces known as Lima Style doubloons were dated 1742, but it is almost certain that they were produced in 1786, and were the first efforts of Brasher to make a circulating coin for local use. Neither of the two known specimens shows the full legends; but weight, gold content, and punchmark are all identical to those for the other Brasher coins. An analogous cast imitation Lima style doubloon dated 1735 bears a hallmark attributed to Standish Barry of Baltimore, Maryland, circa 1787.

An original design was used on the 1787 Brasher doubloon with an eagle on one side and the arms of New York on the other. In addition to his impressed hallmark, Brasher's name appears in small letters on each of his coins. The unique 1787 gold half doubloon is struck from doubloon dies on an undersized planchet that weighs half as much as the larger coins.

It is uncertain why Brasher produced these pieces. He was later commissioned to test and verify other gold coins then in circulation. His hallmark EB was punched on each coin as evidence of his testing and its value. In some cases the foreign coins have been weight-adjusted by clipping.

Catalog Detail

  Brasher Doubloons Value Range Favorite
Brasher Doubloons Value Range  
LIMA Doubloon Brasher, 1742 MS
$2,520,000
-
$2,520,000
$2,520,000 - $2,520,000
1787 Doubloon Brasher, Breast Punch MS
$7,320,000
-
$7,320,000
$7,320,000 - $7,320,000
1787 Doubloon Brasher, Wing Punch MS
$3,000,000
-
$11,220,000
$3,000,000 - $11,220,000
1787 1/2 Doubloon Brasher MS
-
 
Various foreign coins with Brasher's EB hallmark MS
-
 

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Greysheet Catalog Details

The Greysheet Catalog (GSID) of the Brasher Doubloons series of Colonial & Post-Colonial Issues in the U.S. Coins contains 5 distinct entries with CPG® values between $2,520,000.00 and $11,220,000.00.
Among the most famous pieces coined before establishment of the U.S. Mint at Philadelphia were those produced by the well-known New York goldsmith and jeweler Ephraim Brasher, who was a neighbor and friend of George Washington. The gold pieces Brasher made weighed about 408 grains and were valued at $15 in New York currency. They were approximately equal to the Spanish doubloon, which was equal to 16 Spanish dollars.

Pieces known as Lima Style doubloons were dated 1742, but it is almost certain that they were produced in 1786, and were the first efforts of Brasher to make a circulating coin for local use. Neither of the two known specimens shows the full legends; but weight, gold content, and punchmark are all identical to those for the other Brasher coins. An analogous cast imitation Lima style doubloon dated 1735 bears a hallmark attributed to Standish Barry of Baltimore, Maryland, circa 1787.

An original design was used on the 1787 Brasher doubloon with an eagle on one side and the arms of New York on the other. In addition to his impressed hallmark, Brasher's name appears in small letters on each of his coins. The unique 1787 gold half doubloon is struck from doubloon dies on an undersized planchet that weighs half as much as the larger coins.

It is uncertain why Brasher produced these pieces. He was later commissioned to test and verify other gold coins then in circulation. His hallmark EB was punched on each coin as evidence of his testing and its value. In some cases the foreign coins have been weight-adjusted by clipping.

Catalog Detail