Series notes: Colonial & Post-Colonial Coinage

Colonial coinage collectively references any of the coins, tokens, and other pieces that were privately minted in and circulated throughout the early American colonies, or coins that were minted elsewhere and used in Colonial America. Meanwhile, post-Colonial coinage includes privately struck coins or tokens that were minted in the United States in the years immediately following the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776 or coins that were manufactured as prototype coinage or proposal pieces for the federal government. Other coins used in post-Colonial America are pieces that were struck in other nations, such as England and Spain, but utilized as legal tender in the United States until as late as 1857.

Among the most popular Colonial and post-Colonial coins are:

  • 1616 Sommer Islands coins
  • 1652 Pine Tree shillings
  • 1723 Hibernia farthings
  • 1776 Continental dollars
  • 1783 Nova Constellatio
  • 1787-88 Massachusetts half cents and cents
  • 1787 Fugio cents


The arena of Colonial & post-Colonial coinage is complex, as this numismatic genre actually entails hundreds of different types from both the United States (and its forerunning colonies) as well as other nations around the world. Furthermore, these early pieces encompass various coins made from copper, silver, and gold. While Colonial and post-Colonial coinage is generally scarce, some pieces are more common than others. Many collectors – even those who do not consider themselves enthusiastic specialists of early American coinage – enjoy owning at least one or two such pieces. Therefore, it often behooves coin dealers, particularly those who deal in early and classic United States type coinage, to keep a few Colonial and post-Colonial coins on hand.

Please log in to see Greysheet data

  • Bluesheet (wholesale sight-unseen) Values for Colonial & Post-Colonial Coinage

    (Click a title to expand prices)