Monthly report: CAC coins bring premiums in October 2019

1. On October 6, GreatCollections sold a CAC approved MS-65 grade 1932-S quarter for $2306.25 [link]. On October 18, Heritage auctioned two PCGS graded MS-65 1932-S qua

by C A C Grading l Published on November 4, 2019

1. On October 6, GreatCollections sold a CAC approved MS-65 grade 1932-S quarter for $2306.25 [link]. On October 18, Heritage auctioned two PCGS graded MS-65 1932-S quarters, neither of which had a CAC sticker for $1800 [link] and $1921.20 [link] respectively.

1805 25c PCGS XF40 CAC

2. On October 18, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved XF-45 grade 1805 quarter for $3840 [link]. In March, also in Dallas, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded XF-45 1805 quarter without a CAC sticker for $2640 [link]. Neither of these 1805 quarters is of a rare variety.   

3. On October 18, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved XF-40 grade 1839-O half dollar for $2520 [link]. In August at the ANA Convention, Heritage auctioned two PCGS graded XF-40 1839-O halves, neither of which had a sticker for $1860 [link] and $1500 [link], respectively.

4. On October 20, the firm of GreatCollections sold a CAC approved VF-30 grade 1806/5 ‘Large Stars’ half dollar for $1181.25 [link]. On March 20, 2019, Heritage sold a PCGS graded VF-30 1806/5 ‘Large Stars’ half dollar without a CAC sticker for $780. [link]

5. On October 24, Heritage auctioned two PCGS graded XF-45 1924-S Buffalo nickels in successive lots. The nickel with a CAC sticker realized $1200 [link] while the 1924-S Buffalo nickel without a CAC sticker brought $810 [link]. The CAC approved XF-45 1924-S thus realized 48% more!   

1819/8 50c NGC/CAC AU50

6. On October 24, Heritage sold a NGC graded AU-50 1819/8 ‘Small 9’ half dollar with a CAC sticker for $780. [link] In June, at a Long Beach Expo, Heritage auctioned two pertinent 1819/8 ‘Small 9’ halves neither of which had a CAC sticker. A non-CAC PCGS graded AU-53 1819/8 ‘Small 9’ brought even less, $576  [link] than a non-CAC PCGS graded AU-50 coin which went for $660. [link]

7. On October 24, Legend Auctions auctioned a CAC approved ‘Proof-67 Deep Cameo’ 1897 half dollar for $15,275. [link] In March 2018, Heritage auctioned a PCGS certified ‘Proof-67 Deep Cameo’ 1897 half dollar without a CAC sticker for $9600 [link]. Market values for these have not risen significantly, if at all, since March 2018.

8. On October 24, Legend Auctions sold a CAC approved Proof-67 1907 half dollar for $4817.50 [link]. In April 2019, at a Central States Convention, Heritage auctioned a PCGS certified Proof-67 1907 half dollar without a CAC sticker for $3360. [link]

9. On October 24, Legend Auctions sold a CAC approved MS-67 1923-D Saint Gaudens $20 gold coin for $28,200 [link].  In April 2018, at a Central States Convention, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded MS-67 1923-D $20 gold coin, without a CAC sticker but with an old green PCGS label for $14,400 [link], barely more than half as much as the just mentioned CAC approved 1923-D realized.

10. On October 27, GreatCollections sold two PCGS graded MS-64 1922-S Peace dollars with consecutive PCGS serial numbers suggesting that they may have been graded on the same day. The coin with a CAC sticker brought $213.75 [link] and the 1922-S without a CAC sticker realized $147.94 [link].

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Source: C A C Grading

C A C Grading image

CAC was formed in 2007 by John Albanese, a respected authority on coin grading and the rare coin market, along with twenty-two leading members of the numismatic community. Because certified coins of the same grade can be of varying quality, CAC’s mission was to advocate for the hobbyist by establishing an extremely stringent standard of grading. As a verifier of previously certified coins, CAC only recognizes coins that meet the highest standard with the now famous green sticker. Out of all the coins submitted to CAC, less than half receive the honorable CAC sticker. As a result, the CAC sticker serves as an unmistakable means of identifying premium coins for the grade.

In 2022, John Albanese assembled over one hundred and fifty leading members of the numismatic community with a purpose to reclaim accuracy and consistency in grading. After all, why merely sticker a previously certified coin when the same stringent standards can be applied within the context of a grading service? Thus, CAC Grading was born! The only difference now is the grade assigned to a coin is a true representation of that coin. Boasting a team of world-class graders including Ron Drzewucki, John Butler, among others, CAC is committed to applying an unparalleled level of expertise to every submitted coin. As a result, hobbyists can have total confidence in a coin certified by CAC.