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Greysheet & CPG® PRICE GUIDE

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About This Series

The Greysheet Catalog (GSID) of the New Jersey series of Colonial & Post-Colonial Issues in the U.S. Coins contains 16 distinct entries with CPG® values between $195.00 and $660,000.00.
On June 1, 1786, the New Jersey General Assembly granted to Thomas Goadsby, Albion Cox, and Walter Mould authority to coin three million coppers weighing six pennyweight and six grains (150 grains total, or 9.72 grams) apiece, to be completed by June 1788, on condition that they deliver to the state treasurer "one Tenth Part of the full Sum they shall strike." These coppers were to pass current at 15 to the shilling. Matthias Ogden also played a significant financial and political role in the operation. In an undertaking of this kind, the contractors purchased the metal and assumed all expenses of coining. The difference between these expenses and the total face value of the coins issued represented the profit.

Later, Goadsby and Cox asked authority to coin two-thirds of the total independently of Mould. Their petition was granted November 22, 1786. Mould was known to have produced his coins at Morristown, while Cox and Goadsby operated in Rahway. Coins with a diameter of 30 mm or more are generally considered Morristown products. Coins were also minted in Elizabethtown by Ogden and by others in New York.

The obverse shows design elements of the state seal, a horse's head with plow, and the legend NOVA CÆSAREA (New Jersey). The reverse has a United States shield and, for the first time on a coin, the legend E PLURIBUS UNUM (One Composed of Many).

More than 140 varieties exist. The majority have the horse's head facing to the right; however, three show the head facing left. Other variations have a sprig beneath the head, branches below the shield, stars, cinquefoils, and other ornaments.

Catalog Detail

  New Jersey Value Range Favorite
New Jersey Value Range  
1786 New Jersey Date Below MS BN
$258,000
-
$660,000
$258,000 - $660,000
1786 New Jersey No Coulter MS BN
$650
-
$15,600
$650 - $15,600
1786 New Jersey Narrow Shield MS BN
$390
-
$10,000
$390 - $10,000
1786 New Jersey Wide Shield MS BN
$488
-
$3,250
$488 - $3,250
1787 WM New Jersey Large Planchet, Plain Shield MS BN
$300,000
-
$300,000
$300,000 - $300,000
1786 New Jersey Bridle MS BN
$358
-
$156,000
$358 - $156,000
1787 New Jersey Outline MS BN
$247.00
-
$6,250
$247.00 - $6,250
1787 New Jersey Small Planchet, Plain Shield MS BN
$195.00
-
$82,800
$195.00 - $82,800

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1787 New Jersey Large Planchet, Plain Shield MS BN
$312
-
$11,900
$312 - $11,900
1787 New Jersey PLURIBS MS BN
$780
-
$30,000
$780 - $30,000
1787 New Jersey Camel Head MS BN
$195.00
-
$6,560
$195.00 - $6,560
1787 New Jersey Serpent Head MS BN
$358
-
$11,300
$358 - $11,300
1788 New Jersey Head Right MS BN
$260
-
$4,380
$260 - $4,380
1788 New Jersey Running Fox MS BN
$358
-
$144,000
$358 - $144,000
1788 New Jersey Head Left MS BN
$325
-
$216,000
$325 - $216,000
(1786) Copper New Jersey Copper, Washington and Shield MS BN
$186,000
-
$186,000
$186,000 - $186,000
       

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Greysheet Catalog Details

The Greysheet Catalog (GSID) of the New Jersey series of Colonial & Post-Colonial Issues in the U.S. Coins contains 16 distinct entries with CPG® values between $195.00 and $660,000.00.
On June 1, 1786, the New Jersey General Assembly granted to Thomas Goadsby, Albion Cox, and Walter Mould authority to coin three million coppers weighing six pennyweight and six grains (150 grains total, or 9.72 grams) apiece, to be completed by June 1788, on condition that they deliver to the state treasurer "one Tenth Part of the full Sum they shall strike." These coppers were to pass current at 15 to the shilling. Matthias Ogden also played a significant financial and political role in the operation. In an undertaking of this kind, the contractors purchased the metal and assumed all expenses of coining. The difference between these expenses and the total face value of the coins issued represented the profit.

Later, Goadsby and Cox asked authority to coin two-thirds of the total independently of Mould. Their petition was granted November 22, 1786. Mould was known to have produced his coins at Morristown, while Cox and Goadsby operated in Rahway. Coins with a diameter of 30 mm or more are generally considered Morristown products. Coins were also minted in Elizabethtown by Ogden and by others in New York.

The obverse shows design elements of the state seal, a horse's head with plow, and the legend NOVA CÆSAREA (New Jersey). The reverse has a United States shield and, for the first time on a coin, the legend E PLURIBUS UNUM (One Composed of Many).

More than 140 varieties exist. The majority have the horse's head facing to the right; however, three show the head facing left. Other variations have a sprig beneath the head, branches below the shield, stars, cinquefoils, and other ornaments.

Catalog Detail