Series notes: $10 Indian Gold

$10 Indian Head eagles, struck from 1907 through 1933, were designed by world-renowned sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens, whom President Theodore Roosevelt had commissioned to redesign several United States coin series. Unfortunately, Saint-Gaudens died in 1907 before having the opportunity to complete his coveted numismatic mission and thus only this and the eponymous $20 Saint-Gaudens double eagle are the only coins that were ever struck with the famous artist?s designs.

$10 Indian gold eagles are generally classified as two subtypes: Variety 1, struck 1907-1908, has no motto (?IN GOD WE TRUST?) on the reverse while Variety 2, produced from 1908 through 1933, carries the motto on the reverse. Most $10 Indian gold eagle are relatively common in circulated grade and lower Mint State levels.

There are, however, a few exceptions. These include the 1907 Wire Rim with Periods, 1907 Rounded Rim with Periods, 1911-D, 1913-S, 1920-S, 1930-S, and 1933, which range from rare to extremely rare, depending on the specific date and/or grade in question. Among these, the 1933 Indian $10 eagles are the rarest. While a respectable sum of 312,500 were minted only a few survive as the vast majority were melted under Executive Order 6102, which was issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in April 1933 and banned the production of gold coinage.

Please log in to see Greysheet data