CAC Coins Bring Premiums in May

In addition to realizing impressive prices in Internet sales during the month of May, CAC approved coins fared well in live auctions in Dallas County, Texas, and New Orleans, Louisiana.

by CAC Grading | Published on June 5, 2023

Here are a dozen examples, which were selected from a large number of results that could have been listed.

1. On May 3, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved MS-66 grade 1909-S VDB Lincoln cent for $28,800. On Feb. 9, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded MS-66 1909-S VDB Lincoln, without a CAC sticker, for $15,000. Both coins were designated as having ‘Full Red’ (RD) color by PCGS.

2. On May 3, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved AU-53 grade 1795 ‘Two Leaves’ silver dollar for $37,200. Two days later, on May 5, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded AU-53+ 1795 ‘Two Leaves’ silver dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $30,000. Both coins were struck from the same pair of dies.

3. On May 3, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved MS-65 grade 1925-S Peace silver dollar for $72,000. A year earlier, on May 5, 2022, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded MS-65 1925-S Peace dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $16,800. On April 5, 2022, Stack’s Bowers auctioned a PCGS graded MS-65 1925-S Peace dollar, without a CAC sticker, also for $16,800. On Feb. 27, 2022, Heritage sold a different PCGS graded MS-65 1925-S Peace dollar, without a CAC sticker, for this same price, $16,800. Yes, market levels for MS-65 grade 1925-S Peace dollars may have increased from winter/spring 2022 to winter/spring 2023. Even if so, any such increase would not account for the difference between $72,000 for a CAC approved MS-65 1925-S and $16,800 each for multiple PCGS graded MS-65 1925-S Peace dollars.

4. On May 3, Heritage auctioned a CAC approved MS-66 grade 1855 One Dollar Gold piece for $50,400. On Feb. 4, 2022, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded MS-66 1855 One Dollar Gold piece, without a CAC sticker, for $31,200. Market levels for these were certainly not higher in May 2023 than they were in February 2022.

5. On May 14, GreatCollections sold a CAC approved MS-64 grade 1907 half dollar for $1,651.17. On March 28, Stack’s Bowers sold a PCGS graded MS-64 1907 half, without a CAC sticker, for $1080.

6. On May 21, GreatCollections sold a CAC approved MS-65 grade 1923-D Peace dollar for $2,256.10. On March 8, Stack’s Bowers sold a PCGS graded MS-65 1923-D Peace dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $1020. On Feb. 15, Heritage sold a different PCGS graded MS-65 1923-D Peace dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $840. Market levels for these have not increased so far in 2023.

7. On May 25, Legend auctioned a CAC approved Proof-68 grade 1936 Satin Finish (Type One) Buffalo nickel for $6,250. On May 4, Heritage auctioned a PCGS certified Satin Finish Proof-68 1936 Buffalo nickel, without a CAC sticker, for $4,680.

8. On May 25, Legend auctioned a CAC approved MS-64 grade 1916-D Mercury dime for $29,000. On July 14, 2022, Heritage auctioned a PCGS graded MS-64 1916-D Mercury dime, without a CAC sticker, for $24,001.20. Both coins had a ‘Full Bands’ (FB) designation from PCGS.

9. On May 25, Legend auctioned a CAC approved MS-64 grade 1920 $20 gold coin for $10,500. On Jan. 13, Heritage sold two PCGS graded MS-64 1920 $20 gold coins, neither of which had a CAC sticker. One realized $5640, and the other brought $4440. Even if market levels for these were a little higher in May than they were in January, a difference in market levels could not possibly account for all the difference between $10,500 and $5640.

10. On May 25, Legend auctioned a CAC approved MS-66 grade 1923-S Monroe commemorative half dollar for $3000. On April 24, Heritage sold a PCGS graded MS-66 1923-S Monroe half dollar, without a CAC sticker, for $780. On Dec. 28, Heritage sold a different PCGS graded MS-66 1923-S Monroe half dollar, without a CAC sticker, for this same price, $780. The just mentioned CAC approved coin brought nearly four times as much.

11. On May 28, GreatCollections sold a CAC approved, NGC certified Proof-65 1912 nickel for $490.60. On Feb. 20, Heritage sold a PCGS certified Proof-65 1912 nickel, without a CAC sticker, for $360.

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Source: CAC Grading

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CAC was formed in 2007 by John Albanese, a respected authority on coin grading and the rare coin market, along with twenty-two leading members of the numismatic community. Because certified coins of the same grade can be of varying quality, CAC’s mission was to advocate for the hobbyist by establishing an extremely stringent standard of grading. As a verifier of previously certified coins, CAC only recognizes coins that meet the highest standard with the now famous green sticker. Out of all the coins submitted to CAC, less than half receive the honorable CAC sticker. As a result, the CAC sticker serves as an unmistakable means of identifying premium coins for the grade.

In 2022, John Albanese assembled over one hundred and fifty leading members of the numismatic community with a purpose to reclaim accuracy and consistency in grading. After all, why merely sticker a previously certified coin when the same stringent standards can be applied within the context of a grading service? Thus, CAC Grading was born! The only difference now is the grade assigned to a coin is a true representation of that coin. Boasting a team of world-class graders including Ron Drzewucki, John Butler, among others, CAC is committed to applying an unparalleled level of expertise to every submitted coin. As a result, hobbyists can have total confidence in a coin certified by CAC.